Blog

Ideas Lab, Week 7: Mark Carrigan and Steven Watson on ‘Critical Realism vs. Systems Theory’

This week, the Ideas Lab welcomes Mark Carrigan and  Steve Watson for a discussion about the overlaps and points of disagreement between critical realism (particularly the social realism associated with Margaret Archer) and systems theory (particularly the variant associated with Niklas Luhmann). The Ideas Labs takes place every Thursday during term time at 11am GMT. All are welcome! … Continue reading Ideas Lab, Week 7: Mark Carrigan and Steven Watson on ‘Critical Realism vs. Systems Theory’

Webinar 26 Nov 2021: Who should universities serve?  

A critique of the meaning of social impact and value for money Date: Friday 26th of November 2021, on zoom Time:  11am-12pm GMT / 12-13h CETPlease register here : https://cam-ac-uk.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJYkfuyoqzkjG9 Issues at stake Who should universities serve?Chris Newfield, Director of Research of the Independent Social Research Foundation For about fifty years, Anglo-American universities have had one dominant answer to this question: they serve … Continue reading Webinar 26 Nov 2021: Who should universities serve?  

Ideas Lab, week 5: Leigh Lawrence on ‘Ideological policy feedback loops in Chinese education reform’

This week the KPP Ideas Lab welcomes Leigh Lawrence for a session titled “Ideological policy feedback loops in Chinese education reform: A positive development or a negative distraction?”, as usual on Thursday 11th November 11:00 AM . This session will focus on works in progress and ideas that Leigh is currently developing. First, she will introduce a call for participants for a … Continue reading Ideas Lab, week 5: Leigh Lawrence on ‘Ideological policy feedback loops in Chinese education reform’

Webinar: Open access publishing: the oligopoly of big publishing firms and the possibility of alternative models

Date: Friday 22nd of October 2021, on zoom Time:  11am-12pm (British summer time) /12-13h Central European Time Please register here: https://cam-ac-uk.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIsd-2gpjMtE9OO-lz-yq7FBFGQt1NLrck0 Issues as stake Surviving in a bibliometric economy: Perspectives on Open Access journal publishing from the majority world David Mills, University of Oxford The term Open Access is invoked as a normative principle and used to describe a model … Continue reading Webinar: Open access publishing: the oligopoly of big publishing firms and the possibility of alternative models

Webinar: EU digital education policy and digital sovereignty: how to link it to questions of non-proprietary knowledge creation and dissemination?

Date: Friday 8th of October 2021, on zoomTime:  11am-12pm (GMT) / 12-13h (CET) The dilemma of the EU and its digital education policyEva Hartmann, University of CambridgeThis contribution will focus on the digital education agenda of the European Union. This agenda is part of the wider effort of the EU to help its member states to get fit … Continue reading Webinar: EU digital education policy and digital sovereignty: how to link it to questions of non-proprietary knowledge creation and dissemination?

Webinar: The digital:  new wave of privatisation of universities

Friday 24th September 2021, on ZoomTime: 11am-12pm (British summer time) /. 12h-13h (Central European Time)Registration (for free) here for Zoom. The issues as stake: The global power of EdtechJanja Komljenovic, University of Lancaster The education sector is fast digitalising all of its operations. A large part is driven by proprietary digital products and services running on digital platforms developed and … Continue reading Webinar: The digital:  new wave of privatisation of universities

It’s About Time, by Roy Leighton

This essay has been structured for both the spoken and written word; for public performance as well as academic publication. It takes the form of an imagined dialogue between author, playwright, gay, black civil rights activist James Baldwin and white, working-class, academic, and educational social-activist Diane Reay. Much of the text draws from two primary … Continue reading It’s About Time, by Roy Leighton

The Quest for Normativity: Challenges and New Directions in Social Research

ivic Sociology aims to be a forum for the cultivation of normative inquiry within the discipline, and to offer a space for the many conversations that different ethical turns have spurred. In order to contribute to this vision, this call for papers invites contributions from across the social sciences and humanities that address questions related to the challenges and opportunities derived from these different normative turns. It also welcomes papers that reflect on the history of ethical reflection within social research, and on the possible futures opened by different forms of ethical engagement in the social sciences.

State education, petro-pedagogy and Environmental Justice

Throughout this academic year the Education and Environmental Justice (EEJ) steering group has been engaging with a wide range of conversations about the relationships between educational systems, environmental issues and social justice. In our second set of reading group + seminar sessions, we delved into the links between environmental justice and state education through an exploration of the notion of ‘petro-pedagogies’.

The impact of universities on climate change: an interview with Tristan McCowan

Climate change politics have indubitably raised plentiful public concern recently. In this regard, such concerns provide evidence of the socio-political construction and importance of the environmental discourse, since scientific facts on climate change existed since the 1970s, long ago before climate politics surface the universal discourse.  This political discourse derives from the side of those raising the alarm of climate emergency or those denying it.

Participants needed for two projects about technology, inequality, and the future of Higher Education

The Post-Pandemic University is collaborating with the Association of Commonwealth Universities (ACU) to launch a global dialogue about the digital divide in higher education. ACU’s new podcast series will explore how the work of universities is changing as a result of the digital revolution and how they can use their position to confront the challenges posed by digital technology. PPU will be providing a platform to build on those discussions with responses to each episode. Read more about the collaboration and get in touch using this form.

Education and Environmental Justice: Hydro-hegemony and liminality

Mainstream media has given much attention to both the youth movements on the climate crisis and the Black Lives Matter movement over recent years. Readers will doubtless be aware of how these two movements intersect, including through critiques of groups like Extinction Rebellion’s white middle class privilege, and the problematic nature of using a term like the Anthropocene to label this era.

Call for Participants – Digital Inequalities in Education: Pasts, Presents and Futures

Digital inequalities have long existed within education, both within traditional educational spaces and practice, and within specifically digital interactions. These inequalities have deep roots in extant socio-cultural and socio-economic inequalities, and yet emerge in unique ways through the macro and micro dynamics of education and digital technologies. During the COVID-19 pandemic, digital inequalities have been bought into a new light as the infrastructural provisions of classrooms and campuses have given way to various at-home arrangements.

Social Theory Workshop: In Conversation with Adriana Cavarero

Join us in conversation with Adriana Cavarero on her forthcoming book ‘Surging Democracy. Notes on Hannah Arendt’s Political Thought’. The event will explore theorising affect, political demonstrations , protests and bodily interacting as a plurality in public space, using Hannah Arendt as her guide.

Do you have an idea for a book about public sociology?

This is a new monograph series on public sociology which will include work that addresses public and community engagement and the relationship between sociologists and their publics. This series will address not only what sociologists do, but what sociology is for and focus on the commitment to enhance understanding of the social condition so that the lives of people are materially improved.

Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Uncertain Times

We’re sharing information about these seminars which will be of interest to cluster members: This theme explores the dialectical relationship between mind and environment. It looks at what is meant by ‘Human Flourishing’ and explores amongst others such concepts as character, wellbeing, and virtue. We ask how education might be pressed into service in the … Continue reading Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Uncertain Times

18th Annual Kaleidoscope Conference at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge – online 3rd & 4th June 2021

After almost a year of extreme uncertainty and ruptures in our educational experiences – in schools, in preschools, in higher education institutions, in informal and non-formal learning settings – we invite you to reflect with us on the current and future state of education globally.  Changes to daily lives and to educational needs prompt us … Continue reading 18th Annual Kaleidoscope Conference at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge – online 3rd & 4th June 2021

Two PhD positions on neo-nationalism at Aarhus University, Denmark.

The two PhD fellows will be part of the three-year research project ‘Asserting the Nation: Comparative studies on the rise of neo-nationalism in higher education’. The project explores how neo-nationalism has affected European and national higher education policy in France, Poland and Denmark. PhD 1 examines how neo-nationalism has affected university policy in France. The … Continue reading Two PhD positions on neo-nationalism at Aarhus University, Denmark.

The European Educational Research Association Summer School 2021

Beyond the Basics in Educational Research Methodology: Research ethics in educational research The virtual, interactive Summer School 2021, hosted by the University of Jyväskylä, provides PhD/Doctoral students with an opportunity to present and receive feedback on their research, participate in online workshops related to their topic and methodology of research, and engage with research issues … Continue reading The European Educational Research Association Summer School 2021

Critical Higher Education Studies: A CPGJ reading group

Convened by Hannah Moscovitz & Jo Dillabough The reading group provides a critical space for engagement and dialogue on the evolving role of higher education (HE) in contemporary society and its link to broader political, social and economic structures at national, global and transnational scales. Taking a broad transdisciplinary approach, the group will engage with … Continue reading Critical Higher Education Studies: A CPGJ reading group

Equipping PhD researchers for social media success

By Mark Carrigan and Ana Canhoto What training should PhD students receive during their doctorate? It’s increasingly recognised by funding councils that social media are a mainstream feature of academic life, a general professional competence as well as a gateway towards research impact. However, it wasn’t so long ago that this level of acceptance would … Continue reading Equipping PhD researchers for social media success

CfP: The New Geopolitics of International Higher Education

Globalisation, Societies and Education, Special Issue Events and trends of recent years are prompting critical transformations to the geopolitical landscape, with 2020 surely to be remembered as a watershed moment for global politics. From mounting backlashes to multilateralism and free trade, a resurgence of populism and nationalism, the Covid-19 pandemic, climate related emergencies, increased attention … Continue reading CfP: The New Geopolitics of International Higher Education

The Death of a Profession? The Doctoral Programme Amidst the Crisis of Higher Education

By Lakshmi Bose & Rebecca Gordon One of the greatest gifts of the doctoral programme is the time and space to think deeply about what one wants to do in the world and how to go about doing so. Yet, staying committed to a doctoral programme  within the shadow of institutional racism, structural inequalities, and … Continue reading The Death of a Profession? The Doctoral Programme Amidst the Crisis of Higher Education

Agency and Structure: a reflection and a practical exercise

By Sebastian Ansaldo This is a work in progress reflection from CPGJ’s Realist Social Theory reading group In his seminal work “The sociological imagination” C. W. Mills advocates for the importance of critical reflection about the relationship between our personal lives and larger social realities. Jesus Martín-Barbero, likewise, claimed that for social research focused on … Continue reading Agency and Structure: a reflection and a practical exercise

The light we steal when we learn

By Mark Carrigan This extract from Danielle Allen’s superb Why Plato Wrote brought to life an issue which I’ve found myself returning to endlessly over the years. On pg 26 she talks about the Socratic disdain for writing and the capacity for teaching seen to inhere within them. When Socrates says that a written text can be … Continue reading The light we steal when we learn

Realist Social Theory Reading Group

The Realist Social Theory reading group meets on the second Friday of each month for intensive discussions of critical realism and its implications for educational research. These will take place through Zoom In Michaelmas we will be reading Margaret Archer’s Realist Social Theory which is available online here for Cambridge staff and students: October 9th, … Continue reading Realist Social Theory Reading Group

Beyond online learning: Researchers launch live experiment to imagine the post-pandemic university

Researchers from more than 50 universities have launched a project which aims to piece together a coherent vision for Higher Education’s post-pandemic future, while simultaneously operating as a ‘live experiment’ in how it might work. The project, ‘Building the Post-Pandemic University’, is being hosted by the Faculty of Education, is open to academics around the … Continue reading Beyond online learning: Researchers launch live experiment to imagine the post-pandemic university

The Platform University

By Mark Carrigan In recent years, the term ‘platform’ has become ubiquitous, taken up by both business gurus and critical social scientists in a way liable to leave many suspicious of what appears to be a passing fad. It is a slippery term, trading off a range of connotations which are not always apparent to … Continue reading The Platform University

Covid-19 and the Transformation of Education

By Mariano Rosenzvaig Since the outbreak of COVID19 global pandemic, almost every collective and individual aspect of life has been affected in different (and still unfolded) ways. A new and unknown reality has altered work, education, social life, transportation, and everyday routines. The duration and outcomes of this situation are still unclear, but we should … Continue reading Covid-19 and the Transformation of Education

Digital technologies and education in a pandemic context: beyond techno-utopianism

By Sebastian Ansaldo One of the few certainties that have emerged as a result of the current pandemic, is that formal educational is being profoundly changed by new technologies, in primary, secondary and tertiary education. For some, this would mean a new boost to eLearning, which could help in reducing inequities, empowering young generations, bridging … Continue reading Digital technologies and education in a pandemic context: beyond techno-utopianism

Call for Papers: Building the Post-Pandemic University

Organised by Mark Carrigan and Susan Robertson  In a matter of months, the world has changed beyond recognition. Covid-19 has led to an unprecedented reorganisation of everyday life, with half the world’s population subject to lockdown measures at the peak of governmental response to the pandemic. These measures are being eased across the world, with … Continue reading Call for Papers: Building the Post-Pandemic University

Notes from the Lockdown

This post by Mary Murphy is the third part of a three part series “I can never be a global citizen that’s for rich people who travel.  I will never go anywhere outside of Cape Town” (Respondent cites a learner from Kuils River during CW2GC research interview, November 2019). There are many ills attributable to … Continue reading Notes from the Lockdown

Muddying the Waters

This post by Elsa Lee is the second part of a three part series In this second instalment of our blog mini-series I take the opportunity to expand on some of the conceptual work that underpins our study. Our explanations will focus very much on what is meaningful for CW2GC; and will be contextualised in … Continue reading Muddying the Waters

Becoming Interdisciplinary

This post by Elsa Lee is the first part of a three part series The trajectory of my working life has followed a path through very different disciplines. I have moved from an undergraduate degree and a school teaching career in the natural sciences to a postgraduate degree and researching in the social sciences in … Continue reading Becoming Interdisciplinary

Connecting Water to Global Citizenship via Education for Sustainable Development

In the next three instalments of the CPGJ blog, we (Elsa Lee and Mary Murphy) will write about our ongoing research into community-based waterway regeneration projects in the UK and South Africa. It is entitled, Connecting Water to Global Citizenship via Education for Sustainable Development (CW2GC), and is funded by the ESRC (Grant number: RG … Continue reading Connecting Water to Global Citizenship via Education for Sustainable Development

Povinelli’s ‘Three Figures of Geontology’

This week, we are discussing Elizabeth Povinelli’s (strangely prescient) introduction from Geontologies: A Requiem for Late Liberalism, ”Three Figures of Geontology: The Desert, the Animist, and the Virus”. Povinelli is an anthropologist and theorist who engages critically  with both Foucault’s notion of biopolitics, and Mbembe’s notion of necropolitics, bringing in the question of the relationship … Continue reading Povinelli’s ‘Three Figures of Geontology’

Keeping our intellectual communities going during lockdown: a show and tell workshop

By Mark Carrigan and Pat Thomson  Over the last decade social media has gone from being a fringe part of academic life to something which is mainstream. What was once regarded as a slightly suspicious activity has now been recognised as a legitimate means to keep connected within the academy and engage with audiences outside … Continue reading Keeping our intellectual communities going during lockdown: a show and tell workshop

Unlocking Lockdown: Audio Diaries of Disrupted Fieldwork

By Mark Carrigan and Susan Robertson  The Covid-19 crisis has created unprecedented disruption across nearly every aspect of social life. The university is no exception to this and the last two months have seen a rapid transition to remote working, encompassing every aspect of our work. The suddenness of the disruption means that those currently … Continue reading Unlocking Lockdown: Audio Diaries of Disrupted Fieldwork

The physical, abstract and affective picket line in the current UK higher education dispute

By Steven Watson How many times have I said to colleagues in recent weeks, “I wish I was a miner in North Nottinghamshire in 1984”? I don’t know, many times perhaps. I happened to be working in my family’s retail furniture business in New Ollerton in North Nottinghamshire during the National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) … Continue reading The physical, abstract and affective picket line in the current UK higher education dispute

Race, Empire and Education (Online) Reading Group

The readings for this term address the colonial legacies and role of empire in the politics of asylum seeking and refugee resettlement. We will further examine empirical research to consider the educational experiences of refugee-background students and the role of education in their lives and larger communities. Sessions will take place on Google Meet.  If … Continue reading Race, Empire and Education (Online) Reading Group

Critical Realism for Educational Research

Critical Realism (CR) has become an influential approach within educational research in recent years, offering a sophisticated framework through which to approach complex questions at the interface between educational theory and educational practice. It emerged in the UK in the 1970s out of a rich dialogue at the interface between philosophy, social science and Marxist … Continue reading Critical Realism for Educational Research

From Europe to Latin America: the international circulation of education policies

CALL FOR PROPOSALS – PhD and Post-Doc Students – INTERNATIONAL SUMMER SCHOOL FROM EUROPE TO LATIN AMERICA: THE INTERNATIONAL CIRCULATION OF EDUCATION POLICIES. TRANSFER, SELECTION AND ADAPTATION OF KNOWLEDGE AND PUBLIC POLICY INSTRUMENTS University of Strasbourg, Maison Inter-Universitaire des Sciences de l’Homme d’Alsace, France.  23-25 June 2020 From June 23 to 25, 2020, the House of Social … Continue reading From Europe to Latin America: the international circulation of education policies

Entering the Next Decade of Youth Literature and Beyond

The Race, Empire and Education (REE) Collective at the University of Cambridge’s Faculty of Education, in association with Researchers Exploring Inclusive Youth Literature (REIYL), invite you to attend an event with author, editor, and poet Kwame Alexander (see attached poster). On the 28th of February, Mr. Alexander will be presenting, “Entering the Next Decade of Youth Literature … Continue reading Entering the Next Decade of Youth Literature and Beyond

A Cultural Political Economy account of Higher Education in Mercosur

By Aliandra Lazzari Barlete CPGJ’s Aliandra Barlete received the Best Dissertation Award by the CIES’s Higher Education Special Interest Group for her PhD thesis titles ‘A Cultural Political Account of Higher Education in Mercosur’. Below we share the thesis’s prologue. It was a cold day in June 2016 in Montevideo. I sat alone outside the … Continue reading A Cultural Political Economy account of Higher Education in Mercosur

The Transformation of Higher Education: Acceleration, Platformisation and Digitalisation

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED Friday, 03 April 2020, 11am-5pm in London, UK  Register online here: https://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/details.asp?eid=456 There is widespread agreement that universities are undergoing a profound transformation but much less agreement on what these changes mean and how we should characterise them. The Digital University Network has stressed the role of new technologies in … Continue reading The Transformation of Higher Education: Acceleration, Platformisation and Digitalisation

The Public Sociologist in Authoritarian Times: Negotiating Risk and Complicity

Lakshmi Sagarika Bose at the Wolfson Education Society Wolfson College Chancellors Centre Syndicate room 2, 17:45-19:00 (refreshments from 17:30) The confluence of rising authoritarianism and constricting levels of academic freedom highlight the necessity of contending with emerging questions on the political role of the academic in the face of widespread illiberal trends. Increasing arrests and … Continue reading The Public Sociologist in Authoritarian Times: Negotiating Risk and Complicity

Digitalisation, Assetization and the Future of Value in Higher Education

This seminar on Feb 20th from our external member Janja Komljenovic will be of interest to some of our followers. Find out more and register here: Higher education is transforming into an industry consisting of diverse, multiple and variegated markets in which universities are both sellers and buyers of products and services. There is also … Continue reading Digitalisation, Assetization and the Future of Value in Higher Education

What we talk about when we talk about universities

By Jana Bacevic [This review essay was originally published at the LSE Review blog on 19 December 2019] It is perhaps cliché to say that no conversation concerns only its subject. Rarely, however, does this ring as true as when it comes to universities, institutions that are simultaneously objects of inspiration and intimidation, pride and … Continue reading What we talk about when we talk about universities

From hermits to celebrities – How social media is reshaping academic hierarchies and what we can do about it

By Mark Carrigan This was originally published on the LSE Impact Blog To type the word ‘scholar’ into Google Image search leaves you immediately presented with images of bearded white men toiling away in obscurity. It has often struck me how apt this is in terms of the cultural connotations which remain attached to the … Continue reading From hermits to celebrities – How social media is reshaping academic hierarchies and what we can do about it

Our new MPhil programme: Knowledge, Power and Politics in Education

Following a successful launch at the Faculty’s post-graduate open day, applications are currently being received for the Faculty’s new full-time MPhil route in Knowledge, Power and Politics in Education. The course presents an exciting new offering in the Faculty MPhil programme, drawing on an interdisciplinary approach to examine the dynamics shaping knowledge formation in formal, … Continue reading Our new MPhil programme: Knowledge, Power and Politics in Education

The Platform University 2, March 10th-11th 2020

10 – 11 March 2020 Lancaster University Unfortunately, we have to cancel this event for a second time because it clashes with the next UCU strike action. This event won’t be rescheduled and we have left this post here for reference.  Higher education is increasingly ‘platformised’. Indeed, digital platforms have become ubiquitous. They are dominant … Continue reading The Platform University 2, March 10th-11th 2020

Tore Sorensen on Teachers’ Work and Europe

CPGJ are hosting a special lunch-time seminar on teachers’ work and Europe in 2S10 in the Donald McIntyre Building at 1.00-2.30 on Wednesday 20th November, 2019. The seminar will be led by Dr. Tore Sorensen, University of Louvain, Belgium. The title of Tore’s seminar is Between education and employment: EU governance and the Europeanisation of teacher policy. … Continue reading Tore Sorensen on Teachers’ Work and Europe

Letter from Chilean Students at the Faculty of Education

Dear fellow members and students of the Faculty of Education, As Chilean students at the Faculty of Education, we would like to share information about the current situation in our country to raise awareness and international solidarity about this social and political crisis. As you may know, we lived a cruel military dictatorship between 1973 … Continue reading Letter from Chilean Students at the Faculty of Education

The Bernstein Reading Group

The Bernstein Reading Group aims to bring together students and staff who use Bernstein in their study and hence generate a discussion about Bernstein’s work at the faculty. The group’s insight on Bernstein’s work is on using his conceptual tools to discuss issues of globalisation, knowledge and pedagogy. First meeting: Friday 8th November from 5pm-6.30pm … Continue reading The Bernstein Reading Group

Upcoming Critical Realism webinars

Join Us Because “Critical Realism Matters” Webinars on Saturday 16th November, 2019 & Launch of The Bhaskar Memorial Fund Critical Realism Matters is a new series of webinar events held to showcase and celebrate the enormous potential of critical realism. The first pair of webinars, taking place on Saturday 16th November, 2019, have been planned to commemorate the … Continue reading Upcoming Critical Realism webinars

Managing secrets in higher education

In this short essay, Morten Hansen uses secrecy as a prism to deconstruct dynamics and processes in higher education. The reflections spring from various research projects on topics ranging from the Freedom of Information Act 2000, public-private partnerships, and new education markets. The essay begins with experiences that Morten has had interviewing senior decision makers … Continue reading Managing secrets in higher education

Social Media for Academics: The Changing Landscape of Scholarship

Social media has become an inescapable part of academic life. It has the power to transform scholarly communication and offers new opportunities to publish and publicise your work, to network in your discipline and beyond and to engage the public. However, to do so successfully requires a careful understanding of best practice, the risks, rewards … Continue reading Social Media for Academics: The Changing Landscape of Scholarship

Wolfson Education Society meetings

Friday October, 18, 2019, Dr. Mark Carrigan, Postdoctoral Research Associate, Culture, Politics and Global Justice Research Cluster, Faculty of Education “What does it mean to platformise a research centre?” Fuchs House Meeting Room, Wolfson College, 17:45-19:00 (Refreshments from 17:30) Research about social media platforms in higher education has tended to focus on individual users, exploring the … Continue reading Wolfson Education Society meetings

Work in progress, 4 October

First session of this year’s CPGJ Work in progress series 4 October, 12-1.30 PM Academics on the move: thinking through international cooperation with less CO2 Dr Jana Bacevic (Faculty of Education and Department of Sociology) will be talking about her recently completed academic teaching exchange at the University of Aarhus, in Denmark, as well as … Continue reading Work in progress, 4 October

Thinking on film: the next two movie screenings

Culture, politics and global justice research cluster is running a series of film screenings showing how contemporary cinema portrays the practice of ‘thinking’ – whether in the form of philosophy, theory, mathematics, writing, or something else. The Stuart Hall Project 8 November 2019, 5PM, Donald McIntyre Building GS5 Hannah Arendt 15 November 2019, 5PM, Donald … Continue reading Thinking on film: the next two movie screenings

Thinking on film: upcoming screenings

We held the first screening in our new series last week, with Fabrizio Terranova’s Story Telling for Earthly Survival. Here’s a preview of some of the other films we’ll be showing in the cluster over the next few months to supplement our work on social theory and education:

Thinking on film: movie screenings

Culture, politics and global justice research cluster is running a series of film screenings showing how contemporary cinema portrays the practice of ‘thinking’ – whether in the form of philosophy, theory, mathematics, writing, or something else. We’ve mostly selected films that are freely available and go beyond the ‘usual suspects’, but suggestions are always welcome! … Continue reading Thinking on film: movie screenings

Trump, Trumps, Trumpted: Cat and Mouse Games in ‘The Education House of Cards’

By Susan L Robertson I’ve recently been heard remarking something I never thought I would say: politics appears to be trumping economics. Of course, I am mostly talking about the disastrous consequences for the UK economy if BREXIT finally comes to pass in October. This would see the UK coming out of its long-standing regional … Continue reading Trump, Trumps, Trumpted: Cat and Mouse Games in ‘The Education House of Cards’

Prospecting: Extraction, Speculation, and Liberation in the Accelerated Academy

CFP – Prospecting: Extraction, Speculation, and Liberation in the Accelerated Academy  (Accelerated Academy 7) Nov. 22-23, 2019 Michigan State University Digital Scholarship Lab An interdisciplinary symposium on the future of academic life and labor, organized by Zach Kaiser (MSU) and Erin Glass (UC San Diego) In theory, the academy is an institution of research and … Continue reading Prospecting: Extraction, Speculation, and Liberation in the Accelerated Academy

A 10-Day Run Up to My PhD Viva: An Alternative Tale

By Aliandra Lazzari Barlete, Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. First published on the FERSA blog run by graduate students at the Faculty of Education in Cambridge. 02 May 2019, 11am. I hit the treadmill at the College’s gym. My PhD viva is scheduled to start at 2pm. My anxiety levels skyrocketed, and I need to make sure all … Continue reading A 10-Day Run Up to My PhD Viva: An Alternative Tale

The Platform University

This special issue of Discover Society collects articles from speakers at last year’s inaugrial Platform University conference at the University of Cambridge. It has been published to coincide with the release of the call for papers for the second conference, taking place in December at Lancaster University. The Platform University, by Mark Carrigan Assembling the … Continue reading The Platform University

Our upcoming work in progress seminars

We have four work in progress sessions confirmed for Easter term: Charles Mathies (University of Jyvaskyla): We are doing it to ourselves: How university research management platforms are shaping academic research. 3rd May, 12:00pm-1:30pm, Donald McIntyre Building 2S3 Eric Lybeck (University of Manchester): The University Revolution: Re-thinking the Role of Higher Education in Modernity. 17th May, 12:00pm-1:30pm, … Continue reading Our upcoming work in progress seminars

Learner agency at the confluence between rights-based approaches and well-being

Thursday 7 March, 4.30pm to 6pm, DMB 1S3 Faculty of Education, Hills Road, Cambridge In this seminar, Colleen McLaughlin explores Schools, psychosocial well-being and agency: From fragmentation to coherence and Caroline Sarojini Hart discusses A capability approach to children’s well-being, agency and participatory rights in education.  As well as hearing from both speakers, there will be plenty of time for … Continue reading Learner agency at the confluence between rights-based approaches and well-being

Ranking respect: Can teacher status be compared across countries?

By Katherine Aleynikova The more the teachers in a country are respected, the higher the academic results are amongst their students, or so the Global Teacher Status Index 2018 claims to prove. As instinctively plausible as the argument is, and as easily agreeable (who would argue against respecting teachers?), I have to wonder how exactly … Continue reading Ranking respect: Can teacher status be compared across countries?

Theory in Conversation

During Lent term we will hold a series of Theory Workshops which seek to assist students in learning to explore the meanings of theory and their significance for research, thinking and everyday life. In each session, theoretical work will be introduced by a member of the CPGJ Cluster or an invited speaker and they will … Continue reading Theory in Conversation

Can Big Data Bridge the Gap between Knowing and Doing?

By Susan Robertson With the World Education Forum for 2019 just around the corner, I took a quick look at its organising theme: What we should do with what we know: developing educational policy for implementation, impact and exponential success. There’s little doubt that were our knowledge of education systems around the world to be stacked … Continue reading Can Big Data Bridge the Gap between Knowing and Doing?

Progs v Trads: EduTwitter and educational culture wars

A work in progress seminar with Steve Watson on January 11th, from 12pm to 1:30pm in Donald McIntyre Building 2S3.  EduTwitter may be a uniquely British or even English social-media phenomenon, but it has, in the last five years been the site of extraordinary activity involving teachers, educators and consultants in an online engagement about state … Continue reading Progs v Trads: EduTwitter and educational culture wars

CfP: The politics of size in higher education – devices, patterns and spatial imaginaries

World Class Universities remind us of what the German novelist Michael Ende (1963) once described as an illusionary giant. The further away one stands, the bigger the giant appears. The greatness of a university seems more apparent if you are not actually learning or working there. While indeed Oxford (UK), Sorbonne (France), or Heidelberg (Germany), … Continue reading CfP: The politics of size in higher education – devices, patterns and spatial imaginaries

Bridging the gap between academia and social movements: learning with, not from

By Matias Nestore Besides the brief experiences of the UCU strikes and the Decolonise movement last year, most people in Cambridge don’t see their academic lives as overlapping with activism or social movements. Those of us who do engage in them tend to do so outside of the university domain, given that overlapping factors such … Continue reading Bridging the gap between academia and social movements: learning with, not from

Going on a Data Walk in Cambridge

In the last year Alison Powell (LSE) and Ranjana Das (Surrey) have both used data walks to explore how data infrastructures are woven into the fabric of everyday life. This is how Ranjana described the approach they took for a walk in Guilford: With similar plans in mind we set ourselves the task of going to a variety of … Continue reading Going on a Data Walk in Cambridge

PhD or MPhil as a ‘work in progress’ (Secret Seminar for CPGJ students)

Aliandra Lazzari Barlete, Faculty of Education Friday, 30/11, 12.00, Room GS3, DMB Have you ever considered your PhD or Masters degree to be your own ‘work in progress’? One that will lead you towards an intellectual idea, a betterment of your own self, an academic project, or a (hopefully) decently paid career in whatever you … Continue reading PhD or MPhil as a ‘work in progress’ (Secret Seminar for CPGJ students)

Provincialising disruption

By Mark Carrigan The robots are coming! The robots are coming! After watching More Human Than Human, I’ve woken up preoccupied by the rise of the robots narrative and how inadequate it is for making sense of the cultural politics and political economy of automation. The film is an engaging exploration of artificial intelligence and its social … Continue reading Provincialising disruption

Post-H(uman) index? Politics, metrics, and agency in the accelerated academy

November 30th Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge Organised by Jana Bacevic, Mark Carrigan and Filip Vostal Keynote: Liberalism Must Be Defeated: The Obsolescence of Bourgeois Theory in the Anthropocene by Gary Hall, Director of Centre for Postdigital Cultures at Coventry University, UK. The conference seeks to conceptualise change in contemporary knowledge production in a way … Continue reading Post-H(uman) index? Politics, metrics, and agency in the accelerated academy

Call for Chapters: Digital Inequalities in the Global South

This call for books chapter might be of interest to our followers: *Call for Chapter Proposals for an Edited Volume on* *“Digital Inequalities in the Global South”* *Editors: * *Massimo Ragnedda (Northumbria University, UK)* *Anna Gladkova (Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia)* This book will focus on the rising digital inequalities in countries from geographical areas … Continue reading Call for Chapters: Digital Inequalities in the Global South

The Foundations of British Sociology

This workshop co-organised by Mark Carrigan might be of interest to some of our followers. It intends to raise awareness of the Foundations of British Sociology archive maintained by Keele University. This remarkable resource collects a diverse array of materials from the 1880s to the 1950s, gifted to the university when the Institute of Sociology was dissolved in … Continue reading The Foundations of British Sociology

Publishing in an age of social media

These slides are from a workshop which Mark Carrigan ran with Sara Baker at the Faculty of Education in July 2018. The workshop explored how scholarly publishing is changing with the emergence of social media and helped participants develop strategies for linking established and emerging publications together. Publishing in an age of social media from … Continue reading Publishing in an age of social media

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